As a community, we stand united with victim survivors of family violence.

The Week Without Violence (WWV) is an annual campaign to end violence against women.

Since 1999, the northern metropolitan region (NMR) has marked the week, primarily through the Clothesline Project, where every year, hundreds of people paint and display T-shirts to raise awareness about family violence.

Join the Virtual Campaign

Draw your Message on a T-shirt:

  • Facilitate a virtual group session with service users to write, draw or paint a message against family violence on a T-shirt. Alternatively service users may like to do this alone.
  • Hold a virtual T-shirt drawing session during a team meeting and take a screenshot to share.
  • Create a T-shirt and consider sharing, or curating an online collection, with colleagues.

Use your own T-shirt or download a paper T-shirt template.

Get inspired about what to draw on a T-shirt.

Post a Photo on Social Media:

  • Upload photos of T-shirts to organisational social media and websites.
  • Share photos of T-shirts on your own social media.

Share the Campaign:

  • Promote the campaign via organisational websites, social media and newsletters using the social media messages, tiles and hashtags. #WWV #NorthernVoicesAgainstFV
  • Encourage colleagues, neighbours and friends to get involved.
  • Consider taking the campaign offline and sharing key messages and T-shirts on your front fence or other unrestricted places in your community.
  • Share photos of T-shirts with the NIFVS Team at info@whin.org.au for a region-wide promotion on social media and through the NIFVS eNews and website.

20th Anniversary WWV Film

View the 20th Anniversary Week Without Violence film, created in 2019 to celebrate the history in the region.

Resources to Support your Campaign Activity

Education:

Response and referral:

History of the Week Without Violence

The Week Without Violence is an initiative created by YWCA USA in 1995. Over the past two decades, organisations around the world have hosted community events to end violence against women.

Activities focus on raising awareness, promoting attitude change and enabling individuals and organisations to begin positive actions towards ending violence in their communities.

History of the Clothesline Project

In 1990 a coalition of women’s groups in Massachusetts, USA, developed a program to break the silence and bear witness to the prevalence of violence against women.

The Clothesline Project was designed to:

  • act as an educational tool for those who come to view the clothesline;
  • act as a healing tool for anyone who made a T-shirt; and
  • allow those who are still suffering in silence to understand that they are not alone.